Haematology outpatients has moved to main outpatients near A&E at the front of the hospital

DPP-4 Inhibitors (Alogliptin, Linagliptin, Saxagliptin, Sitagliptin)

This leaflet is designed for people taking a DPP-4 inhibitor, also known as a ‘gliptin’ for type 2 diabetes.

What does this medication do?

These medications work to lower blood sugar levels by increasing the amount of insulin
the body produces and decreases the amount of sugar made by the body.

How do I take this medication?

This medicine is taken once daily at the same time each day, before or just after a meal. If
you miss a tablet and remember later in the day you can still take it.

If you remember the following day, do not take two tablets together.

Who can’t take this medication?

DPP-4 inhibitors may not be suitable for certain people.

These include people with Type 1 diabetes, pregnant women or people with a history of
pancreatitis.

Your doctor or prescriber will review your medical history when prescribing a DPP-4 inhibitor to check it is suitable for you.

What are the common side effects?

Many people experience no side effects taking a DPP-4 inhibitor. However, like all
medicines, DPP-4 inhibitors can cause side effects.

Some people may experience headaches, a rash, nausea or problems with their nose or
throat.

A serious but rare side effect to be aware of is pancreatitis. If you have severe abdominal pain whilst taking this medication, please seek medical attention urgently.
This group of tablets do not cause you to gain weight.

Do I need to be monitored?

You do not need to test your own blood sugars when taking a DPP-4 inhibitor unless you
are also taking other diabetes medications. Your healthcare team can advise you on this.

Your doctor will monitor your kidney function whilst you are on this drug.

Are there any sick day rules?

You can continue to take this medication whilst you are unwell.

What about driving?

Certain people with diabetes need to inform the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency
(DVLA). This depends on your medication regimen, whether you hold a group 1 or group
2 licence and other individualised factors.

Full advice can be found on the DVLA website

If you have any queries about this medication, contact your diabetes team, GP or pharmacist.